Christina Cole Romance

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The Cosmos is Revolving

An_Eye_For_Synchronicity__58383_zoomSynchronicity is such a fascinating thing!

Whenever I see it at work in my life, I do a quick double-take. “Did that just happen?” I ask myself.

I learned years ago to take note of apparent “coincidences”. Life often speaks to us through such means.

What is “synchronicity”? Glad you asked.

 

 

The word can be broken down into its separate parts.

  • SYN – A prefix meaning united or joining together
  • CHRONO – A combining form relating to time
  • ICITY – A suffix used to form abstract nouns from adjectives

In other words, SYNCHRONICITY is a concept that relates to things happening at the same time. It’s almost a synonym — there’s that prefix again — for COINCIDENCE, but in my experience synchronicity has a more definite sense about it. When it occurs, I can’t help but feel that some unseen hand is guiding events, leading me directly to places where I’m supposed to be, showing me lessons that I need to learn.

The word was first coined by Carl Jung to describe an “acasual connection of two or more psycho-physic phenomena”… whew!  That’s a rather long-winded way of saying the same thing, but if you’d like to read more about Jung and his theories — as well as the golden scarab that inspired his thinking — you’ll find it all here:

Carl Jung Resources

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In simpler terms, he described synchronicity this way:

A meaningful coincidence of two or more events where something other than the probability of chance is involved.

He believed that synchronicity is a part of life and that we should be mindful of its presence:

Synchronicity is an ever-present reality for those who have eyes to see.

Years ago, a good friend first taught me about the principle of synchronicity, and I’ve always loved his short, simple definition. “The cosmos is revolving,” he used to say, referring to those strange moments when life suddenly seems to have a theme, when everything you see or do seems to be pointing in one direction.

YESIt’s also been called “alignment with the divine”.

We must learn not only to open our eyes but to open our hearts. Synchronicity can guide us when we remove the expectations that so often limit us.

Synchronicity is all about possibilities, and it’s a great adventure in life.

Someone once remarked that synchronicity is life’s way of saying, “You’re getting warmer…”

Or maybe it really is life shouting “Yes!”

The day is still early, but already my morning has been filled with an awesome synchronicity. Life seems to be calling me in a specific direction, and I’ll gladly follow to see where this adventure will lead.  Life is teaching me to go another step, to do a little more, to give a little more, to add an extra bit of effort to everything in my life.

Today I’ll be looking for ways to follow that guidance.

I’ll do more than serve dinner; I’ll set the table with a special centerpiece.

I’ll do more than think about a friend; I’ll send a greeting.

I’ll do more than exist; I’ll live this day as fully as I can.

Synchronicity is, indeed, a marvelous, fascinating thing…not just an abstract concept or a theoretical principle, but a very real fact of life. I hope you’ll remain open to those moments of synchronicity that come into your life…and I hope you’ll follow wherever they lead.

Thank you for visiting today!

May your day be filled with joy and happiness.

 


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A Thought for Today: Peace of Mind

Peace of mind

There is no greater wealth in this world than peace of mind. 

I believe this is true. After all our struggles for riches and worldly success, we’ll always finds ourselves poor in spirit until we realize that real wealth — and happiness — comes from within. It comes from knowing who we are and being at peace with our self.

Life is best lived with balance and wholeness, and the curious thing is that we can only find peace of mind when we listen to our heart.

What is your heart telling you today?

 


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A Thought for Today: Change

 

Butter

If nothing ever changed, there would be no butterflies.

Sometimes we get stuck in ruts in life. Sometimes we feel that things will never change. Truthfully, changes are taking place around us — and within us — each day. Even though the positive changes we desire may seem slow in coming, we can recognize and celebrate every small step we take toward our goals.

Butterflies have long been a symbol of change and transformation. It’s amazing to see the process taking place.

Life caterpillars morphing into butterflies, we are continually in a process of becoming. We change, we grow, we learn. It’s not always easy, and sometimes we’ll struggle, but if we stay focused on the positive results we seek, we can become who and what we hope to be.

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Who are you becoming?


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A Thought for Today: Choices

Camus

Life is the sum of all your choices – Albert Camus

Although we may sometimes feel as if life is something that happens to us, the truth is we play a role in creating our future through the choices we make. Each day, we make choices that affect our health, our happiness, our relationships.

Wise choices can bring us closer to the life we want; poor choices leave us struggling to get through each day.

Most of the time, we know what’s right. We know healthy foods are better for us than fattening desserts. We know it’s important to get enough rest. We know the importance of treating others with kindness. Yet time after time, we make choices we later regret.

At other times, we simply make wrong choices. Maybe we misjudged someone or something. Maybe we didn’t have all the information we needed. For whatever reason, our choice proved not to bring us the happiness we expected. It happens.

So make choices today that you won’t regret…and when you make a mistake, learn from it and make new choices for tomorrow.

pink-divider-no-background-hi

What choices are you making today?


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Make a Mess!

Creativity

I say these words over and over because they’re so very true. I don’t recall the source, but I do remember when I first heard them. I was sitting on the living room floor, surrounded by a mess of papers, drawings, art supplies, books, and snacks as I worked on a project. Yes, creative people make big messes.

It was then as I began the “cleaning up” process that I fully understood this little saying. As I sorted through ideas and inspirations — keeping some and discarding others — my mess turned into a completed project.

I approach fiction from this perspective, too. I make a huge mess with story ideas all over the place. I scribble notes on odd scraps of paper. I grab research books to keep close at hand. Putting a story together does get very messy indeed.

For what it’s worth, my current project — The Sheriff Wore Skirts — is a disastrous mess at the moment. Even though I began with a synopsis for the publisher, now that I’m working on the story, I’m seeing new possibilities. New characters are emerging. New complications and conflicts are happening.

What do I do?  I let it happen. It’s wondrous fun.

To me, it’s much like working a jigsaw puzzle…only first, I have to create all the pieces.

I won’t use them all. As with any creative project, I’ll find myself throwing away things that aren’t needed, sorting out what’s right for the story, getting rid of ideas that don’t fit. Gradually, the mess will be picked up. The research books will go back on the shelf. The little scraps of paper will be tossed aside. A finished manuscript will come together, ready to go to the publisher.

Don’t ever get discouraged when your creative efforts result in a huge mess. That’s how it’s supposed to be. It’s a process, and making a mess — the bigger, the better — is the first step toward success. Celebrate all the mixed-up, confused ideas. Scatter the pieces of your own puzzle around so you can look at them from different angles. Pick things up and play with them. Enjoy the mess!

Then begin the cleaning-up process. Throw away or set aside things you know you don’t need. Find what’s most important and build around it. Add in possibilities that might work. Discard ones that don’t work.

Slowly and surely, as you clean up the mess — whether it’s an art project, a poem you’re writing, a recipe you’re cooking, or any other endeavor — you’ll see a beautiful creation shining through.

 

 


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Playing by the Rules

I’ve been browsing through The Writer’s Guide to Character Traits, written by pyschologist Linda Edelstein. It’s an interesting book, and I’ve enjoyed reading about various adult personality types.

I’ve always believed that understanding is a key component of good relationships — in real life and in fiction, as well. So from time to time, I’m going to share a bit of information regarding Edelstein’s basic personality types. Perhaps this knowledge will help us build stronger relationships — and for the writers among us, create realistic characters.

Today, I’m sharing a few thoughts about conformists.

Conformity2The conformist believes in following rules and regulations, going along with others, and acting in a responsible manner.

Conformists are staunch supporters of law and order in society, and generally consider themselves to hold high moral standards.

Life with a conformist can be comfortable. These folks don’t like to “rock the boat” or make a fuss about anything…unless someone goes too far afield of their traditional beliefs and values, in which case the conformist can become rigid and dogmatic. They will then insist on upholding what they perceive as “right”.  They can be extremely intolerant, demanding that others conform to their way of thinking.

There’s a bit of interesting history behind the word, Conformist.

In England, Conformists were individuals whose religious practices were in line with the requirements of The Act of Uniformity. These acts — there were several — established rites and rituals for the Church of England, specifying prayers books to be used and the order of services performed.  Those who opposed the acts were called Noncomformists.

Today the words have come to mean anyone who “goes along with the crowd” or one who “marches to a different drum”, respectively.

Our society sends very mixed messages about conformity. We place children in classrooms and teach them to behave in very specific ways. We give them rules to obey.

  • Sit at your desk.
  • Raise your hand to ask a question.
  • Walk in single file as you leave the classroom.

At the same time, we speak of individuality, the need to recognize our own uniqueness, and the importance of learning to think for oneself.  Little wonder we’re often confused about who we are…and who we’re supposed to be.

Overall, despite our efforts to teach it and instill conformist values in our children, conformity gets a bad rap throughout history.  Ralph Waldo Emerson spoke out against it.

nonconformist-quotes-2

So did President John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

Conformity-president-quote

 

Conformists rarely stand out in society. They’re content to follow others and can make valuable assistants, always well-versed in “company policy” and willing to do what’s asked of them.

In fiction, we find two kinds of conformists. We sometimes see a character who is intent on following all the rules — to the detriment of their own happiness. My latest release, “No Regrets“,  features a shy young woman who, in the words of the hero, is stuck being…

“…the prim and proper Miss Richards, the quiet little mouse who never disturbs anybody, has never once told a lie, and who would never think of breaking any of society’s rules.”
We see the overbearing conformist at times, too, in the guise of a well-meaning parent or a moral leader. As conformists, they often join others in their intolerance.  I’ve included these characters in my stories, too, most notably the women of the “Ladies’ Charitable Society” in my fictional town of Sunset, Colorado.  Here’s a quick look at the ladies, from “Keeping Faith“.
Not only Mrs. Gilman, but all the other women as well wore black. They reminded Tom of a bunch of crows perching in the parlor, hovering about, ready to peck the eyes out of him and his mother if they made a wrong move.
Maybe conformity is best treated as a useful tool, not as a way of life. There are times and places where perhaps it’s best to go along,  to do what’s expected, and to accept little things that aren’t really worth making a fuss about.

Yes, rules are important. So are laws.  Sometimes we do need to follow others…so long as they’re leading us in the direction we want to go.

When all is said and done, the most important thing is knowing who we are and living our life fully.
be-yourself-everyone-else-is-taken

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Clothes Make the Man…or Woman

poloniusFor the apparel oft proclaims the man.

–William Shakespeare, Hamlet 

 

When Polonius gives out advice in Hamlet, much of it should probably be taken with the proverbial grain of salt. Polonius was a bit of a blow-hard, a fellow who loved the sound of his own voice.

His immortal words have been transformed into the more modern adage that “clothes make the man,” to which Mark Twain once added, “Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

I’m not sure about that, but all of that’s a bit beside the point. The real question for today isn’t about the influence we wield but simply about the clothes we wear. More to the point, the clothes we love.

Often on Facebook, question games go around. Example: The last thing you ate plus the color you’re now wearing gives you your rock band name.  I usually end up with Plaid nachos. Hey, it’s kinda catchy, don’t you think?

If clothes really do make us who we are, I’m a comfortable, casual homebody. I love wearing baggy old T-shirts and flannel PJ bottoms. Yes, that’s me. It’s exactly who I am.

Today’s question from my little “Q & A A Day” book is this:

What’s your favorite article of clothing?

PJSI’d have to say my comfy, cozy plaid flannel PJ bottoms.  Years ago I bought one set (the ones on the left) and I loved them so much, I ordered a second set (the ones on the right.) I found them in the Lakeside Collection catalog, and would gladly order more if they had different colors.

I also like my Mickey Mouse T-shirt, my worn-out old sneakers, and, when the weather turns cool, an old sweatshirt that once boasted of the glories of Missouri but whose colors are now so worn you can’t read much of anything.

Obviously, to me, comfort is far more important than fashion.

 

 

What’s YOUR favorite article of clothing?

What do YOUR clothes say about YOU?